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Thread: Could someone tell if I'm using the wrong parts, or just wiring it wrong?

  1. #1

    Default Could someone tell if I'm using the wrong parts, or just wiring it wrong?

    My first time wiring a custom saber & it just isn't working. I'm putting the new electronics into a busted, old UltraSabers hilt I bought for cheap years ago & I just wanted to spruce them up. I never wanted a fancy one with the SoundBoard & color-changing, just a reliable dueling saber that's bright & can be recharged without disassembling it. I also used JSTs between the Driver & LED in case I decide to swap colors later.

    First attempt:
    [Battery + Port + Switch + Driver + LED - Driver - Port - Battery]

    Second attempt:
    [Battery + Port + Driver + Switch + LED - Driver - Port - Battery]

    Current attempt:
    [Battery + Port + Driver + Switch - Driver + LED - Driver - Port - Battery]

    Each time after finishing the soldering, I plugged the Recharge in just to ensure there was actually power in it. I'd charge for 10-15 minutes, then unplug and press the switch. Every time, no light.

    My Parts list:
    Power Source:
    18500, 3.7V/1400mA PCB Lithium Ion **Replaced with 7.4V/1400mAh** (TheCustomSaberShop)

    Charging Port:
    2.1mm MWS Recharge Port (TheCustomSaberShop)

    Activator:
    16mm non-illumimated Anti-Vandal temporary Switch (TheCustomSaberShop)

    Driver:
    6-Wire LUXDrive 1000mA BuckPuck (TheCustomSaberShop)
    Light:
    Custom Blue/Cyan/White Tri-Cree LED (TheCustomSaberShop)

    Here is my most recent wiring with the 7.4V battery:
    Saber_Wiring.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Targos; 09-20-2021 at 06:20 PM.

  2. #2

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    It would be helpful if you could draw it out or take a photo.

  3. #3

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    You're using the wrong battery for that driver...it requires a minimum input of 5 volts...your battery is only capable of 3.7 nominally, or 4.2 on a full charge. What you use to drive the led will also depend on how you have them wired, either in series or parallel.

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  4. #4

  5. #5

  6. #6

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    It's possible your recharge port is wired incorrectly.

    https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8066/...7aaf1e8a_b.jpg

    Check to be sure it's wired according to this diagram.
    We all have to start somewhere. The journey is all the more impressive by our humble beginnings.

    http://led.linear1.org/1led.wiz for the lazy man's resistor calculator!
    http://forums.thecustomsabershop.com...e-to-Ohm-s-Law for getting resistor values the right way!

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Silver Serpent View Post
    It's possible your recharge port is wired incorrectly.

    https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8066/...7aaf1e8a_b.jpg

    Check to be sure it's wired according to this diagram.
    I quadruple checked that, it's seemingly not the issue.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay-gon Jinn View Post
    You're using the wrong battery for that driver...it requires a minimum input of 5 volts...your battery is only capable of 3.7 nominally, or 4.2 on a full charge. What you use to drive the led will also depend on how you have them wired, either in series or parallel.
    What exactly do you mean by Series vs Parallel?

  9. #9
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    Series: components are connected linearly, with the positive lead connected to the negative lead of the next component. The current across all components is constant, the voltage drops according to current*resistance of each component. Total resistance of the circuit is the sum of the resistance of each component.
    Parallel: components are connected positive to positive, negative to negative. The voltage is the same for all components connected in parallel, the current is calculated according to current/resistance of each component. The total resistance is the inverse of the sum of the inverse of each resistance, or 1/(1/R1+1/R2+1/R3...)

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zacharyah View Post
    Series: components are connected linearly, with the positive lead connected to the negative lead of the next component. The current across all components is constant, the voltage drops according to current*resistance of each component. Total resistance of the circuit is the sum of the resistance of each component.
    Parallel: components are connected positive to positive, negative to negative. The voltage is the same for all components connected in parallel, the current is calculated according to current/resistance of each component. The total resistance is the inverse of the sum of the inverse of each resistance, or 1/(1/R1+1/R2+1/R3...)
    I have my parts wired in Parallel then, Battery(+)Recharge(+)Button(+)BuckPuck(+)LED(-)Buckpuck(-)Recharge(-)Battery

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