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Thread: Hilt Wiring

  1. #21
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    Ahh... yes. If it's not it should be wired between one of the battery leads not both. Pick one, + or -, and splice the switch into it.

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  2. #22
    Jedi Council Member Firebird21's Avatar
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    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">Originally posted by james3

    From what you are describing, you wired the switch in parallel and therefore when you turn it on it is shorting, you need to have the switch on only one leg either + or -.<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">


    That's what I'm thinking... When the switch is off it creates a complete circuit.

    When you turn the switch on it shorts the battery and starves the rest of the circuit of power.

    That's why it appears to be wired correctly, but the battery heats up.


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  3. #23

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    You are all wise and im just a padawon. Thank you millions<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">Originally posted by Firebird21

    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">Originally posted by james3

    From what you are describing, you wired the switch in parallel and therefore when you turn it on it is shorting, you need to have the switch on only one leg either + or -.<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">


    That's what I'm thinking... When the switch is off it creates a complete circuit.

    When you turn the switch on it shorts the battery and starves the rest of the circuit of power.

    That's why it appears to be wired correctly, but the battery heats up.


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    Dagger77

  4. #24

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    I posted a diagram up on my last post and here again it's a little small but you get the idea.


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  5. #25
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    <font size="3"><font color="purple">I think that people sometimes forget, or don't know, that a circuit it is a circular path both from, and back to the battery. A switch interrupts that pathway (preferably along the part of the path going directly from or to the battery) of that circuit, that's what it's for.

    Hooking up the switch to both wires from the battery defeats the intended purpose somewhat and causes other problems.

    Some people may think that power comes from both terminals of the battery and ends at the part that is being powered from it and that's not the way an electrical circuit actually works.</font id="purple"></font id="size3">

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