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Thread: Kylo Crossguard 2.0 help

  1. #1

    Default Kylo Crossguard 2.0 help

    I have a Korbanth Crossguard 2.0 that came installed with RRW tri-Cree main and single red side leds. The board it has is a prizm 5.1. The issue I am having is the tri Cree led is getting super hot! Too hot to touch. Why is this happening? I thing that the white die might be faulty on this tri Cree. Could that be the reason it it getting hot? I have all my positives joined together and resisted before the board. I have all my negatives joined together and resisted before the board. The positives are going to the kill key tab that goes to to the board. The tri Cree negatives are going to L1 and the small side led negatives go to L3 if I remember correctly. The negative for the white die from the tri Cree is on pad L2. Any help would be appreciated.
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  2. #2

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    Cree LED's do heat up, that is normal. They should be attached to a metal heat sink to absorb and radiate the heat away from the star. Most of us use copper, it looks like yours are aluminum. What resistors are on the red die? Which battery are you using? What problems besides heat on the stars are you experiencing?

    "Let the past die."

  3. #3

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    3F6FCEB1-75A4-4BFA-8449-F4BD80F9774B.jpg9A3BCB3D-AE0D-4A81-94BE-B8893706FEF6.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Tilmon View Post
    Cree LED's do heat up, that is normal. They should be attached to a metal heat sink to absorb and radiate the heat away from the star. Most of us use copper, it looks like yours are aluminum. What resistors are on the red die? Which battery are you using? What problems besides heat on the stars are you experiencing?
    I am not sure what resistors are being used. I bought the saber this way and had a problem with it so I disassembled it. I was going to reassemble it and when I checked everything before I put it back together I noticed that the aluminum heat sink was getting so hot I could not touch it. Honestly I donít know if it was like that before I took it apart or not. I attached a photo of the resistors & the battery so you could see the color bands on them and see what kind of battery. The only other problem I am having is the white die on the led is very very dim. I believe it is bad. I have checked all the setting on the Ed card multiple times to make sure they where correct. The only thing that I did differently than the original install is I ran all my positives to the post in the recharge port and then only Ren one wire from there to the board to simplify the wiring going to the board. Would that make it heat up like itís doing or does it not make a difference?
    3F6FCEB1-75A4-4BFA-8449-F4BD80F9774B.jpg
    Last edited by darth father; 04-07-2020 at 08:09 AM.

  4. #4

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    Those look like 1.2 ohm resistors, although its hard to tell. You can measure their resistance with a multi-meter. There should be one resistor for each red die. So you should have a total of 4: 2 on the tri cree for the main blade, and one for the quillion. Sounds like your white die is fubar. Replace the tri-cree with a new R,R,W.

    "Let the past die."

  5. #5

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    There is two resistors the side blade negatives are on one and the negatives for the tri Cree are on one.

  6. #6

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    That is wrong. Each red LED needs its own independent resistor, unless they are 2.4 ohm, and even then, I wouldn't do it that way. My guess is you have a single resistor feeding both, if I'm correct in my thinking, then you are underdriving the LEDs, because they are splitting the available V/A between them. Again, you should have a 1.2 ohm resistor on each quillion red, and 2 on the main blade tri cree. Thus, you should have 4 resistors on this build, at least. Because white is only FOC, you may get away with no resistor, but the fact you already have a blown white LED indicates otherwise. So, in this build, you should have 5 resistors, one for each red and one for white. No LED on the star should share a resistor. That is my input here.

    "Let the past die."

  7. #7

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    How do you fit all of those in the Crossguard 2.0 hilt? I am going to be using the goth padawan chassis with the removable battery and flat speaker.

  8. #8

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    Each chassis is different, you have to find some place where they will all fit into. On the padawan for the CG 2.0, my guess is they will fit in the saber head behind your LED Module, and where the CG wires come through into the hilt from their thread points. These are common problems you have to work around when installing a saber.

    Tom

    "Let the past die."

  9. #9

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    You can put the resistor on any direct line positive or negative that goes only to that one LED. You commoned up all your positives and negatives, which is ok, but the resistors have to go on independent lines to each LED before those junctions. Between the LEDs and the junction. So, I common up all my positives on a tri cree, the positives for all the diodes are connected on my star. I have one red wire feeding all three diodes positive. Then I have an independent wire feeding negative to each led on the star. So I have 4 wires coming out of my star: positive (common to all LEDs), and a negative for each LED (which are independent). I then put my resistor on the negative independent lines. It doesn't matter which stream the resistor goes into, but if you put it on the positive end, you cannot common up positive until after your resistors, so you cannot common positives on the star. I know this is clear as mud.

    Here is a photo of a raw RGB LED Star, with "rough wiring" prior to resistors.


    Here is the LED Module for that star with resistors on the independent negative lines.


    Now this is an RGB LED. You can see that I have commoned up all positives on the star with red wire, and only one red wire leaves the star feeding all three diodes on the star positive. Each negative; however, has its own wire. Orange wire is negative for Red LED, Green is the negative for green LED, and Blue is the negative for blue LED. I then put the appropriate resistor on each of the independent negative legs. I have 4 wires, because I have to maintain the independence of the RGB LED for appropriate color mixing. Red to LED1, Green to LED2, and Blue to LED3.

    Now, you are using a R,R,W. So lets suppose you have 2 orange wires feeding each of your negatives for the 2 red diodes. Each of those orange wires needs a resistor for your red diodes. You can then join those wires (after the resistor) to go to your board. So, if you commoned up the 2 orange wires after the resistor, you would have 3 wires running from your star: Positive, Orange feeding both resistors for red, and Blue feeding the white. I hope you understand. You do not have enough resistance in your circuit, and will fry your leds. You have to find a way to fit them in.

    Because your quillions are single cree, you need only one resistor for each quillion. See if you can fit them in the hilt or chassis.

    Tom
    Last edited by Tom Tilmon; 04-13-2020 at 11:41 AM.

    "Let the past die."

  10. #10

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    Thank you for all of your help Tom. You've been great and the only one to reply so thank you again. I love all the sabers that you build and I fully trust your advice. I will be building my saber withing the next few weeks. You have helped out a fellow Kylo Ren cosplayer!

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