Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Question about removable chassis

  1. #1

    Default Question about removable chassis

    So Iím trying to figure out how the sabers with removable chassis work? For example the activation switch, if the whole thing is removable how does the switch still operate? I get recharge port just stays built into the chassis but the switch part is confusing me lol.

  2. #2

    Default

    The outer sleeve of the saber typically has a plunger that presses the real button in the chassis.
    We all have to start somewhere. The journey is all the more impressive by our humble beginnings.

    http://led.linear1.org/1led.wiz for the lazy man's resistor calculator!
    http://forums.thecustomsabershop.com...e-to-Ohm-s-Law for getting resistor values the right way!

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Silver Serpent View Post
    The outer sleeve of the saber typically has a plunger that presses the real button in the chassis.
    See that’s what I thought but then my brain was like “maybe they have metal contacts and when the chassis slides into the place the contacts connect with the switch allowing it to work” lol I over analyze stuff sometimes

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrutalMaz View Post
    So I’m trying to figure out how the sabers with removable chassis work? For example the activation switch, if the whole thing is removable how does the switch still operate? I get recharge port just stays built into the chassis but the switch part is confusing me lol.
    If you have room you can attach the switch with JST connectors and just unplug them and slide out the core chassis, I've done that a few times.

  5. #5

    Default

    I've also seen a version where, for example, GCS has a new saber with a removable chassis. In that saber, the switches are recessed and part of the chassis. Then the outer part has a hole in it allowing you to press the button on the chassis through the hole. I believe it's one of his production sabers called "Vector"

    ShtokyD also utilized some sort of plug on his chassis for his KAM lightsaber to make the switches able to be "unplugged" before removing the chassis. Should be able to find something if you Google "ShtokyD KAM"

    Both solutions are beyond my capacity to produce anything similar, but it doesn't stop me from admiring them!

  6. #6

    Default

    I did this on my latest build. It’s very difficult especially if your using two switches. It was the hardest part of my build. If your just doing a soundboard say a Nano with only one switch I believe it’s a bit easier. One of the difficulties is not having your saber rotate out of alignment.

  7. #7

    Default

    Could you use a disguised set screw for anti-rotation?

  8. #8

    Default

    One switch is no easier than two switches. It makes no difference. If one lines up, they both line up. If there is a fixed point of alignment it cannot rotate.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Greenie View Post
    One switch is no easier than two switches. It makes no difference. If one lines up, they both line up. If there is a fixed point of alignment it cannot rotate.
    Like a groove on the inner chassis with a screw to keep it aligned?

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by k6gad View Post
    Like a groove on the inner chassis with a screw to keep it aligned?
    Exactly that. Or a groove in the inner hilt and a proud screw on the chassis.

    http://forums.thecustomsabershop.com...l=1#post271592

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •