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Thread: Dat finish

  1. #1

    Default Dat finish


    figured out how to get that translucent look of greasy steel, you really have to see it in motion to get the real effect. If there's enough interest i'll make a tutorial, but the kind of paint used is a bit unusual and not the safest for the novice, and comes with a bible's worth of caveats (nitrocellulose lacquer) . The awesome thing about it is that the light reflects the silver from under the paint giving a steel/bronze look depending on how much it's sanded after the Lacquer dries. I had a ton of this stuff left over from repainting some guitars so i started expirimenting, so if this is something you guys want I'll order a plain mhs part to do a step by step.
    If you refuse to bridge the gap, You will always be on the other side.

  2. #2

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    Nice! I would like to see how it's done.

  3. #3

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    Me too!
    Join me, join the dark side!

  4. #4

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    I'm interested as well. Looks great!

  5. #5

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    Bring it on dude. No lollygagging.
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  6. #6

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    Been a bit busy, but I'll give it a start.
    these are the paints used, besides flat black primer




    first sanding will start with 800 grit automotive sandpaper, the finer paper will leave it less perfect than starting low and working your way up, this needs imperfections to really look right. this may have to be followed with a second primer coat, then 800 grit again. after you have the edges showing bare aluminum, switch to 2000 grit for a light sanding, this is the final sand before lacquor and should look like this. the rough area on hilt is masking tape, only the pommel is the part I'm painting here.

    it should have imperfections that look a bit like pitting in steel, now its ready for clear/tint coating. I will post those pics once i can get the ventilation set up.
    the brass finish is the vintage amber on plain aluminum, the copper is actually copper guitar shielding tape.
    Last edited by Dark Helmet; 02-20-2017 at 09:19 PM. Reason: spelling, etc
    If you refuse to bridge the gap, You will always be on the other side.

  7. #7

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    next step- adding the lacquor tint- ONLY IN A WELL VENTILATED AREA, and preferably with a mask...
    EDIT: If at any time you decide you hate it or want to start over, this will clean off of the aluminum with acetone within a few minutes with very little work

    starting with the aged clear as a base/sealer, give a few light coats spread a few minutes apart (ignore the instructions on the can). give it about 15 minutes to set up and give it a light coat with the vintage amber. After another 15 minutes or so cover it in a few more light coats of the aged clear.

    it should have a slight yellow/green to brown tinge to it. follow the same sanding pattern as before, 800 to start, 2000 to give it a satin sheen


    repeat this process until you either achieve the desired effect or just get sick of it. This finish has major durability issues but at the end you will want to seal it all in with clear polyurethane, satin with proper finish sanding or gloss for a more greasy look. More to come once i finish with the final coats/sanding and pick up some polyurethane.
    Last edited by Dark Helmet; 02-21-2017 at 10:32 AM.
    If you refuse to bridge the gap, You will always be on the other side.

  8. #8

    Default

    GREEEEEEEEASSSSSSSSSEY <in the voice of "Bubble" from trailer park boys>. Nice effect. The progress so far is top notch. I also like how you have selected the certain parts to apply this "trick" to. Can't wait to see final results.

  9. #9

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    I didnt get photos of the final step, but it's kinda pointless once you see the final result. the best sealer ive found is minwax wipe on poly, 5-6 coats using 2000 grit sandpaper in between coats (again, ignore the label) followed by a 2000 grit final sand. the reason i missed the chance for pics is my addition of rust, lots of it. most will be removed along with the acrylic base weathering with a scotchbright pad, then redone in layers with aluminum black/rust/color.. The grey paint is iron rust paint that has not reacted to the oxidizer yet



    EDIT: thought it would be rude to not give a full body shot, the grey areas will be full rust by morning, most of this weathering will be coming off as its just a baseline. I like to go crazy with it, then clean it up until its just right.
    Last edited by Dark Helmet; 02-22-2017 at 09:55 PM.
    If you refuse to bridge the gap, You will always be on the other side.

  10. #10

    Default

    It looks really good! Thank you for the tutorial!
    Join me, join the dark side!

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