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Thread: General hilt building

  1. #11
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    DARTH KALEL's Avatar
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    you need a set of machinists wrenches, you can get them at pep boys or similar and they are just 8 to 12 inch long wrenches from the really small to like 3/4. I picked up a set of snap ons for like 60.00 but they are really nice, but they had some cheaper ones for like 20.00

    I've been trying to find out the same thing, i'm trying to design the blade holder now if I have any luck I will let you know. it's going to be a custom lathed piece so..

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  2. #12

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    Reddragon, i don't know if this answers your question, but here it goes:

    on a big maglight (the one that takes 3 D batteries), if you unscrew the cap and take out the mirror there should be the bulb and a big empty space. SCH 40 1" pvc jut so happens to fit that gap pretty well. (1 or 2 millimeters of space.) once you firmly secure the pvc to the maglite (how i am not quite sure), the 1 in polycarbonate tube should fit in quite snugly. i am not sure if this will work, seeing how i don't have any polyC to test with. then just put a lens on it of your color choice on it.

    if this works, it would be one bright-as-hell blade

  3. #13

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    If I wanted to put a sink tube overlay over my existing saber, do I need the sinktube adapter or can I just drill n tap holes in the existing parts. I know in theory that would obviously work, but I didn't know if the adapter piece was more special than just pre drilled holes.
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  4. #14
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    The sink tube adapter is only for making sabers out of a sink tube, without hilt or extension pieces, for example. The electronics go inside the sink tube, and the blade holder screws onto the adapter.

    The MHS parts (hilts and extension pieces) are made for a sink tube to slip over, specifically so that you can use one to make over lays. Cut to your desired shape and secure as necessary.
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  5. #15
    Jedi Padawan astromech_kuhns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post
    2. body pieces - these pieces slide over the 'hilt' piece to give the saber it's look - be it a DV style saber, As, LS, or whatever
    what is the diffrence between the DV AS and LS aaber styles?

    Thanks(pics would be nice)

    Kolton Kuhns
    if you are new these links will get you started

    tutorial on ohms law!!!
    the saber building dictionary-a dictionary with basically everything about sabers!
    thread index-this is the thread index!
    the basic saber building tutorial-tutorial for making basic hilts!
    start here if new-start right here if your brand new fresh out of the factory never before opened noob!


  6. #16

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    I was just wondering what you guys find to be the best way to get good lines cut in a tube or sink tube without goofing up. Is it merely practice, or do you cut small and file out to the lines? I tried using a rotary/engraving/cutting type bit in my dremel and was having a hard time getting true lines, and it kept wandering, so I searched some more and heard people use just plain cutoff wheels, and i tried that but still dont find it to be as square as i would like. thanks much

  7. #17

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    Cutting wheels work but they do wander. You have to cover everything with masking tape. Then you have to use a diamond cutting wheel. I got one from American Science and Surplus. You should steady the piece in a vice and have both hands on the dremel when using it. Laser cutting is probably better but I wouldn't expect it to be cheap. After the piece is cut, you should file it (preferably with a diamond file).

    You might be able to mill out sections but finding a mill is a challenge. Those things are to expensive to buy for just a few saber pieces.

  8. #18
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    Obi-Dar Ke-Gnomie's Avatar
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    As for me, I just use a cut off wheel and files. I don't cut right on the line, I leave a little margin for error and clean it up with a file. It takes a while, but you have more control doing the last bit by hand. As you practice with the Dremel, you can leave less margin to file away. I usually only leave about 1mm, but I have a pretty steady hand. You may want to leave more than that.

    The other trick is to take your time, and don't try to carve too much material at once. You basically want to shave the material away.

    Pick up a set of assorted jeweler's files. They cost under $10, but they're worth their weight in gold.


  9. #19

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    Dremel cut off wheel to take off the bulk of material and then use sanding drums to fine tune the work down to the lines you want it to be at. Using the dremel sanding drum pretty well ensures you will not remove too much material at once or have the tool wander off your intended line. Use the low(rough) grit initially and then the smaller grit ones when you're just about there.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by B5813 View Post
    Dremel cut off wheel to take off the bulk of material and then use sanding drums to fine tune the work down to the lines you want it to be at. Using the dremel sanding drum pretty well ensures you will not remove too much material at once or have the tool wander off your intended line. Use the low(rough) grit initially and then the smaller grit ones when you're just about there.
    That's pretty much what I do, with one extra step. I use normal cut-off wheels and cut just shy of the line, about a millimeter or so like Obi-Dar. Then I use a sanding drum to bring the metal edge to the line I want it to be on. I generally use a very light touch when I get near the line I want. This helps me get pretty even curves and lines. Then afterwards I use sandpaper to really smooth out the edges and get rid of burrs and other little sharp bits so there ain't no chance of me ever cutting myself on an edge I Dremel'ed. You might want to try a file between the sanding drum step and the sandpaper step...I personally don't use a file because I generally get the shape I intend with my sanding drum.

    Everyone's got their own way of doing it...just remember that it takes alot of practice and patience...soooooo much friggin' patience....

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