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View Full Version : Wireing a 2w/3w max speaker



Havatreinar
05-24-2013, 06:10 PM
Hey I am really new to this and I am readying a Electronics Fundamentals book to learn how to work with electronics. I was wondering if I could damage a 2/3 watt speaker buy powering with a 7.4 volt Li-on battery or if I should use resistors to lower the amount of watts going to the speaker. I am talking about the 2/3 watt speaker you guys provide. I'm not wanting to damage it and every time I use ohms law it says that I should use a 27.38 ohms of resistance. Should I plug in a bunch of resistors or will the resistance of the wire itself be enough. I'm not sure how to figure out if I actually need a resistor at all when doing any of this. Any help would be nice. Thanks everyone.

Forgetful Jedi Knight
05-24-2013, 06:18 PM
Hey I am really new to this and I am readying a Electronics Fundamentals book to learn how to work with electronics. I was wondering if I could damage a 2/3 watt speaker buy powering with a 7.4 volt Li-on battery or if I should use resistors to lower the amount of watts going to the speaker. I am talking about the 2/3 watt speaker you guys provide. I'm not wanting to damage it and every time I use ohms law it says that I should use a 27.38 ohms of resistance. Should I plug in a bunch of resistors or will the resistance of the wire itself be enough. I'm not sure how to figure out if I actually need a resistor at all when doing any of this. Any help would be nice. Thanks everyone.

Since you are using a speaker, I will assume that this will be attached to a sound card, in which case, you just wire it to the sound card (there are always 2 pads with Plecter Labs products) and your problem is solved. Any of the speakers sold here are compatible with and of the sound cards sold here, or basically any of the cards used in the hobby.

Havatreinar
05-24-2013, 06:25 PM
Thanks that helps a lot. Now my question is this. How do those pads work and does the crystal core sound board have one? I am ocd when it comes to understanding things. So if you can explain how to decide what "pad" to use and how it works would be awesome.

Forgetful Jedi Knight
05-24-2013, 06:34 PM
Thanks that helps a lot. Now my question is this. How do those pads work and does the crystal core sound board have one? I am ocd when it comes to understanding things. So if you can explain how to decide what "pad" to use and how it works would be awesome.

Crystal core??? You mean Crystal Focus? Yes the Crystal Focus boards also has speaker pads (otherwise the board would be kind of useless as a sound card). All you have to do is solder the two wires from the pads to the back of the speakers. There are diagrams in the sound card manuals, plus there are many diagrams laying around here on the forums for most of the cards.

Havatreinar
05-24-2013, 06:38 PM
oops yeah I meant crystal focus. Sorry for sounding super newbish because I am. I just started learning all this stuff a few days ago. I don't understand what speaker pads are and how they function/work. That's what im asking know. I hate getting plug it in and turn the power on for answers. What math is used what is it doing to the power running through it? If this isn't the forum for this type of question please let me know and ill move it. Also thatnks for let me know I don't have to worry about a resistor for my speaker.

Forgetful Jedi Knight
05-24-2013, 07:00 PM
Yeah, I got that you are kind of newbish. ;) :D

To keep this kind of simple, the sound card has a little amp (and other things that produce sound and control the LED's, etc. etc.) and the card has the 2 little speaker pads, which create a circuit with the speaker you attach to them. Since the card is the Intellectual Property of Plecter Labs, I seriously doubt you will be given a detailed answer as to the design of the board that you seek.

So, although you won't like the answer... connecting a speaker to the speaker pads (and making all the other necessary connections) and turning it on is the simplistic answer, since it is designed to be a board specially designed for our requirements of building lightsabers.

Silver Serpent
05-24-2013, 07:02 PM
Speaker pads are soldering pads that you connect a speaker to. There are two different sound boards sold here at TCSS: The Nano Biscotte and the Petit Crouton.

http://www.thecustomsabershop.com/Nano-Biscotte-Sound-Module-V1-P806.aspx
http://www.thecustomsabershop.com/Petit-Crouton-Sound-Module-V20-P612.aspx

Read through the manuals for one or the other (or both) to get an idea how to hook up components to the boards. Unless you get the prewired version, you'll need to use a soldering iron.

gilroy
06-08-2013, 03:08 AM
hi everyone well topic and good descation

BlessedWrath
06-08-2013, 08:04 AM
It is also worth mentioning that, like switches, speakers do not have a polarity. It does not matter which wire goes where so long as you have one wire leading from each speaker pad to each terminal on the speaker. As long as you don't short anything, it should be fine.

Get either the speaker sold on Plecterlabs' website, the Railmaster 2W Bass, or any of the speakers sold at TCSS. There are minor differences in performance, but power ratings should all be compatible as was mentioned earlier. I've run my Railmaster at max volume for the entire duration of my 18650 7.4v pack's runtime (2600mAh) without damage, so you should be fine.

Where you want to be extra careful is wiring LEDs to the board. They are like certain kinds of dogs: They will eat until they die. LEDs are the ones that need resistors, or constant-current drivers. The manual should explain that in great detail. Accent LEDs are going to take much less power than blade LEDs, which is also covered.

My suggestion is two or three cups of coffee and a couple of hours alone with the manual. I have answered 90% of my own questions by re-reading the manuals every chance I get. Sometimes a bit of information takes a while to sink in. I'll be wandering around the store and, suddenly, it hits me: "OOOOOH! THAT's why they did it that way..." and one more mystery is solved. Just take your time and study the manual religiously. I would also search the build threads and read as many of them as possible.

People to study: IndustrialAction, FenderBender, Slothfurnace, Saberforge, Erv (of course), and quite a few others. They are ridiculously skilled and may answer your questions just in how they go about their own builds. I know they've helped me out quite a bit.

Hope it goes well for you.